Dr. Butkins Blog

Dr. Peter Butkins blog entries for MyFreedomQuest.com

Glen Rice, Wizards, Shot in leg, Marijuana

Is Cannabis a harmless drug? Is the following coincidental?  You decide.

Doc Pete

 

Ex-Wizards wing Glen Rice Jr. shot in leg outside Atlanta restauarant

Eric Freeman

 

 
.Detroit Pistons forward Josh Smith (6) draws a charging call on Washington Wizards guard Glen Rice Jr. (14) in the second half of a preseason NBA bask...

Detroit Pistons forward Josh Smith (6) draws a charging call on Washington Wizards guard Glen Rice Jr. (14) in …

Pro basketball player Glen Rice Jr. was shot in the leg Sunday night during an argument at an Atlanta restaurant and arrested for reckless conduct and marijuana possession, according to a police report obtained by Jennifer Brett of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Rice, the son of three-time NBA All-Star Glen Rice, has played 16 games for the Washington Wizards over the past two seasons before being released in January. He figured to spend this season in the D-League or overseas.

 

TMZ.com first reported the story, but the AJC report provides more concrete information:

The Atlanta police report from Sunday night says that officers met with a restaurant employee upon responding to the scene, on Ivan Allen Boulevard. The employee said that a group of men who had been at the restaurant began quarreling and were asked to leave.
The squabbling continued outside, and a shot rang out. The report does not indicate who is suspected of doing the shooting, which injured Rice in the leg. A Smith and Wesson revolver was later recovered at the scene, and may be stolen, the police report said.

The restaurant, Scales 925, is owned by rapper T.I., but he is not mentioned in the police report in any context.

The AJC story also contains the full police report, including these details:

“There is video footage from the restaurant that shows the altercation on the parking lot, and the male with the red shirt shot at Mr. Glen Rice on the left leg, and the subject left the location as a passenger on a black sedan that was parked on the curb waiting for him. Then Mr. Rice was seen on the video running on Ivan Allen Blvd. side of the building, and he threw a black revolver on a stairwell that was adjacent to the sidewalk. [...]
“A series of drops of bloods lead to the loaded revolver that was found on Ivan Allen Blvd side. The serial number of the weapon is: H37601 Smith and Wesson 32 Cal. Long. I ran the weapon and it is possibly stolen out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. It takes them 24 hours to confirm if the weapon was actually stolen, and an investigator will follow up with Chattanooga. ID unit 7346 arrived on scene and took pictures on the scene, he took blood samples of the sidewalk, and took the shell case, and the revolver and they were placed in Police property as evidence. I drove to the next crime scene on 68 Linden Ave where the vehicle is located, which was secured by Officer Bien-aime. ID arrived on scene and took pictures of the vehicle.
“I noticed a black book bag that was abandoned on the parking lot next to the Porsche. I opened the bag and found 240.4 Grams of marijuana and a US Passport that belongs to Mr. Rice. ID took pictures of the bag and its contents, and the bag was handed over to Investigator Fowler along with $5,953 in cash that was in Mr. Rice’s possession when he was shot and they were left inside the vehicle to be taken to property as evidence. Mr. Rice was charged with reckless conduct and possession of marijuana (240.4 Grams).”

Rice entered the D-League after being dismissed from the Georgia Tech basketball team in March 2012 following a bizarre incident outside an Atlanta nightclub. Rice was only charged with permitting unlawful operation of a vehicle, but a student manager in the same car was charged with driving under the influence and another passenger was charged with discharging a firearm under the influence (apparently by accident). Rice had had several disciplinary issues prior to his dismissal and spoke of that incident as a wakeup call.

We will update this story as more details become available.

- - - - - - -

Eric Freeman is a writer for Ball Don't Lie on Yahoo Sports.

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Why are we here?

As we age,  there is a tendency to explore our place in the universe.  Nothing else makes sense but to leave things a little better than we found them.  This can be done anywhere, at any time and in many ways. The sense of achievement and feeling of helping can make all of this meaningful.  What is better than being useful?

Doc Pete

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Lamar Odem - Why do we find out too late! JUST SAY SOMETHING!!!

Addiction is highly treatable.  We usually 'break denial' and become motivated to seek help for alcohol and drug problems when there is a crisis.  This is in part because we cannot see the problem the same as we can see other addictions such as people smoking cigarettes.  The symptoms are not visible.  However, this is not only because the problem is invisible.  The problem is predominantly kept secret by power driven, greedy so-called specialists who hustle people into treatment centers, promise success and give ineffective treatment when the client and the family is terrified of death or incarceration, thus shielding them from the consequences needed to get sober and clean.  They take the money from desperate victims only to discharge them when this money runs out.  Most clients drink and/or use drugs immediately after they leave the treatment center anyway.

This is why the problem proliferates and perpetuates.  There is too much profit stemming from ineffective treatment.  Lack of integrity and character prohibit effective treatment.  Let's take the hustle out of treatment.

Get better Lamar.  Then get effective treatment from your free twelve-step program.  It's the only way to get sober and clean - this is based on my 50 years of treating addicts and alcoholics and watching the successes and failures.

Doc Pete

Thanks for your support.  God knows we need your efforts.

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Recovery lessons contradict Mental Health lessons - Paradoxes of learning!

An example is when I was in graduate school taking counseling classes and was told that we have to take charge of our life.  Then in recovery I was instructed to give up control of my life as I had no control.

The paradox unwinds when I use a Higher Power (HP) to give me control and then I can act from an illusion of control.

I have power through a Higher Power.  I did not birth myself and I have little control over death.  In between, I have free will.  When I give this to an HP, I have control and live without much fear or negativity.  I like this choice. Nothing else makes sense.

Doc Pete

Thx for your support.  I can do little without you.

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Drug Dangers; A Fatal Disease - You Never Know!!!

When an M.D. prescribes a medication that is mood-altering, one never knows how it will affect the patient.  Different medications can have more extreme side effects for certain people.  When a person takes a 'street drug', the effects are a gamble with one's life.  Read results below from MSN.com homepage, 9-11-15.  These are not rare occasions.  I see them in my practice and I have a pulse on the community of Central Florida and see tragedy weekly.  Addiction is usually fatal!!!  

Doc Pete

 

 

 

 

 

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Major League Coach suspended for alcohol related problems...

Yahoo news (9-07-15) announced that Coach Moeller was suspended indefinitely but the article went on for four paragraphs before mentioning in the fifth paragraph that alcohol was involved.  This is typical of the avoidance of media when reporting drug and alcohol problems, especially with celebrities in the public eye.  I have been witnessing this since the 1970's. Usually, the alcohol and/or drug report is hidden or avoided by placing it at the end of the  article.  With obituaries that are alcohol or drug related, it is usually missing.  Coroners are usually lay persons and do not want to shame the family.  While this is understandable, it helps to proliferate the fallacy that addiction can be controlled with will power and, if you cannot do this, you are weak.  I wonder how many broken-hearted parents and significant others have unintentionally angrily spread this fallacy.i

If we are to arrest this fatal problem we need a synthesized effort, visibility of the fatality of addiction and accurate information about the primary, progressive, chronic and fatal nature of addiction.  Any disease that cause cancer, heart attacks, kills diabetics and is so easily treatable has to be visible.  Doc Pete

The article follows:

A troubled NFL coach has been suspended a second time since coming to the league.

 

Andy Moeller, the Cleveland Browns' offensive line coach, has been suspended indefinitely "effective immediately," according to a team-issued statement.

 

It continues:

“Over the weekend, Andy was involved in an incident, involving allegations that we take very seriously. We have followed our internal protocol, determining that right now it is best for the team and for Andy to take time away from the organization to focus on his personal matters. We are going to respect the process of investigation on this personal matter and will have no further comment at this time.”

Although the Browns did not go into details of the incident in question, Vince Grzegorek of Cleveland Scene reported that Moeller was not arrested but that police were called to his house. The incident reportedly involved a woman from Maryland and the case now is in the hands of the prosecutor who is waiting for the incident report to be filed by the police officer. 

 

Moeller has had repeated run-ins with the law in the NFL. In what was his third alcohol-related incident in a four-year span, Moeller was convicted on DUI charges in 2011. He was with the Baltimore Ravens at the time and said, per The Sporting News at the time, "I understand the seriousness of the charges and take responsibility. I will never put myself in this position again."

Moeller has been with the Browns since the start of the 2013 season after six seasons with the Ravens. Previously, Moeller — the son of former Michigan coach Gary Moeller — worked in college at Army, Missouri and Michigan over the previous two decades. He also played college football at Michigan.

The Browns have an assistant offensive line coach, George DeLeone, who presumably will take over full responsibility of coaching the offensive line until there is a resolution on Moeller's status. 

Obviously, this is a bad look for a team that is trying to earn its way back to respectability and has had more distractions, such as Johnny Manziel and his off-field trouble as a rookie, than success stories of late.

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Tony Stewart says Kevin Ward was high on Cannabis.

Fox Sports reported that Tony Stewart, Nascar car driver, stated that Kevin War was impaired on marijuana and should not have been outside of his car when Stewart hit and killed him (Fox Sports, 08/28/15).  If true, pot can kill!

God rest Mr. Ward Jr.

 

Doc Pete

Let's "just say something" instead of shielding users, abusers and friends of users and abusers.

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What I believe about addiction.

One of ten persons have an obsession with drugs and/or alcohol.  These will not use safely.  This include Cannabis.  The problem is genetic.  We must not judge users the same way we don't judge diabetics who cannot make insulin normally.  We must have logical and mature conceptions about addictions so that we can have logical and mature solutions based on a real desire to help and not based on greed and power.

Doc Pete

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Many Drug Overdose Deaths Due To Non-Medical Use Of Prescription Pain Medication

In an examination of unintentional overdose deaths in the state of West Virginia, a majority of these have been found to be associated with the nonmedical use and diversion of prescription drugs, especially pain relievers, according to an article released on December 9, 2008 in JAMA.

In the management of chronic pain, guidelines were introduced in 1997 encouraging the expanded use of opioid pain relievers, pending stringent patient evaluation and full counseling, if other treatments are inadequate. Since then, the retail purchases of just such analgesics, including methadone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, increased enormously, according to the article. This was accompanied by a parallel increase in emergency department visits and deaths attributed to opioid pain reliever overdoses. According to the article, West Virginia has suffered one of the highest increases in these types of deaths in the United States, having a 550% increase in death from unintentional poisoning between 1999 and 2004.

To investigate the association between these deaths and use of prescription opioids, Aron J. Hall, D.V.M., M.S.P.H., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues, examined risk characteristics associated with patients dying of unintentional pharmaceutical overdose in West Virginia in 2006. Data was collected from medical examiners, prescription drug monitoring program, and opiate treatment program records. All state residents who died of unintentional pharmaceuticaloverdoses in West Virginia that year.

Of the 295 who died, 67.1% (198) were men, and 91.9% (271) were between the ages of 18 and 54. Of the deceased, 63.1% had used pharmaceuticals which contributed to death without documented prescriptions, and 21.4% had received prescriptions from five or more clinicians in the previous year. Women were more likely to have "shopped" for multiple clinicians than men, with 30.9% of them performing this act while only 16.7% of men did. Meanwhile, use of the drugs without documented prescriptions was more common for those two died between 18 and 24 years of age. Of the total population, 94.6% had at least one indicator of substance abuse.

Deaths related to illegal prescription use were often associated with a history of substance abuse, nonmedical pharmaceutical administration, and illicit drugs. Deaths with prescriptions from multiple doctors were more likely to have had previous overdoses, and less likely to have alcohol contributing to death.

Of the total, 79.3% (234) of deaths were linked to multiple contributory substances. The most prevalent class of drugs was the opioid analgesics, contributing to 93.2% of deaths, and of these, 44.4% showed evidence of prescription documentation. Methadone was the most commonly identified drug, and it was involved in 40% of all of the deaths. Fewer of the deceased had prescriptions for methadone than for other drugs such as hydrocodone or oxycodone.

The authors note the important role of doctors themselves in the use of prescription opioids. "Clinicians have a critical role to play in preventing the diversion of prescription drugs. Clinicians and pharmacists need to counsel patients who are prescribed opioids not only about the risk of overdose to themselves but also about the risk to others with whom they might share their medication. In addition, clinicians should follow recent published guidelines for the management of chronic pain and refer patients as needed to pain management specialists. Clinicians should also make use of state prescription drug monitoring programs to determine whether their patients are getting scheduled drugs from other clinicians. Clinicians can now obtain such information about their patients from prescription drug monitoring programs in most states," they write.

A. Thomas McLellan, Ph.D., of the Treatment Research Institute, and Barbara Turner, M.D., Ms.Ed., of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, contributed an accompanying editorial in which they state several steps physicians should take to help reduce the likelihood of inappropriate prescription opioid use.

"When deciding whether to prescribe an opioid, physicians should ask patients about their prior and current histories of alcohol and other drug use. Patients with histories of substance use, mental health problems, or both should receive special attention and co-management from pain management specialists when possible. Treatment of mental health disorders should be considered part of successful pain management."

"Physicians also should consider an opioid treatment agreement (contract) with the patient stipulating the frequency of obtaining medications, timely refills but no early replacements for lost prescriptions, safe storage, no sharing, single-source prescribing, monitoring through urine screens, and adherence to monitoring visits. The agreement should be presented as a way of simultaneously protecting the patient from adverse events and promoting a collaborative, responsible relationship," they write.

Patterns of Abuse Among Unintentional Pharmaceutical Overdose Fatalities
Aron J. Hall, DVM, MSPH; Joseph E. Logan, PhD; Robin L. Toblin, PhD, MPH; James A. Kaplan, MD; James C. Kraner, PhD; Danae Bixler, MD, MPH; Alex E. Crosby, MD, MPH; Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH
JAMA. 2008;300(22):2613-2620.
Click Here For Abstract

Prescription Opioids, Overdose Deaths, and Physician Responsibility
A. Thomas McLellan, PhD; Barbara Turner, MD, MsEd
JAMA. 2008;300(22):2672-2673.
Click Here For Abstract

Written by Anna Sophia McKenney
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