There are 14 entries in this glossary.
Term Definition
Paradox
  Paradox the extraction of meaning from an apparent incongruity is a common recovery experience (e.g., “to get it, you must give it away;” “when you think you’re looking good, you’re looking bad;” “you can find serenity when you stop looking for it”).  
Partial Recovery
  Partial Recovery is 1) the failure to achieve full symptom remission (abstinence or the reduction of AOD use below problematic levels), but the achievement of a reduced frequency, duration, and intensity of use and reduction of personal and social costs associated with alcohol/drug use, or 2) the achievement of complete abstinence from alcohol and other drugs but the failure to achieve parallel gains in physical, emotional, relational, and spiritual health. Partial recovery may precede full recovery or constitute a sustained outcome (see Emotional Sobriety, Wellbriety).  
Partnership Model
  Partnership Model is the term used to distinguish the nature of the service relationship in the recovery management model from traditional “expert” models of problem intervention. Partnership implies a more enduring relationship and one with greater mutuality of rights and responsibilities.    
Pathways (to Addiction and Recovery)
  Pathways (to Addiction and Recovery) is a phrase that connotes the movement into and out of addiction and into (and potentially out of) recovery. The image of pathways conveys the notion of choices that ultimately shape one’s personal destiny. There have been many advocates of single pathway models of addiction and recovery: addiction is caused by one thing, unfolds in a highly predictable and homogenous pattern, responds to a narrow approach to treatment, and remains in remission through a singular approach to recovery management. Single pathway models are being replaced by multiple pathways models: there are many etiological pathways to alcohol and other drug problems; these problems unfold in highly diverse patterns and vary considerably in their course; different types of AOD problems respond to different intervention approaches; and there are multiple pathways and styles of resolution for AOD problems (see Roads to Recovery).  
PCP (Pencyclidine)
  PCP is a tranquilizer illegally manufactured in labs and sold as tablets, capsules, or colored powder. It can be snorted, smoked, or eaten. Developed in the 1950s as an IV anesthetic, PCP was never approved for human use because of problems during clinical studies, including intensely negative psychological effects. Street Names: Angel dust, ozone, wack, rocket fuel, and many others. Effects: Many PCP users are brought to emergency rooms because of overdose or because of the drug's unpleasant psychological effects. In a hospital or detention setting, people high on PCP often become violent or suicidal.  

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Glossary List

  • Paradox
      Paradox the extraction of meaning from an apparent incongruity is a common recovery exp
  • Partial Recovery
      Partial Recovery is 1) the failure to achieve full symptom remission (abstinence or the
  • Partnership Model
      Partnership Model is the term used to distinguish the nature of the service relationship in the
  • Pathways (to Addiction and Recovery)
      Pathways (to Addiction and Recovery) is a phrase that connotes the movement into and ou
  • PCP (Pencyclidine)
      PCP is a tranquilizer illegally manufactured in labs and sold as tablets, capsules, or