There are 230 entries in this glossary.
Term Definition
Achieving Visibility (or Voice)
  (Achieving) Visibility (or Voice) is the process through which historically disempowered people become seen and heard as they take responsibility for their own recovery. Recovery thus becomes an antidote to silence and invisibility. Visibility for recovered and recovering people is achieved by standing as a witness and offering public testimony to one’s return to life (Williams, 1992)
Acts of Responsibility
  Acts of Responsibility constitute one of the four daily rituals of recovery that span the various pathways of recovery (White, 1996). Acts of self-care, which involve efforts to reverse the damage of addiction and establish new health-oriented habits, can also be thought of as acts of selfrepair. Care of the “self” in recovery transcends the self-centeredness that is the cumulative essence of addiction. Acts of self-care might more aptly be described as acts of responsibility–responsibility not just to self, but to family and community. Acts of self-care constitute a paradox of recovery: taking care on oneself serves as a way to help others (by example), just as helping others is a way of helping oneself.
Acts of Self-Care
  Acts of Self-Care constitute one of the four daily rituals of recovery that span the various pathways of recovery (White, 1996). Acts of self-care, which involve efforts to reverse the damage of addiction and establish new health-oriented habits, can also be thought of as acts of selfrepair.Care of the “self” in recovery transcends the self-centeredness that is the cumulative essence of addiction. Acts of self-care might more aptly be described as acts of responsibilityresponsibility not just to self, but to family and community. Acts of self-care constitute a paradox of recovery: taking care on oneself serves as a way to help others (by example), just as helping others is a way of helping oneself.
Acts of Service (unpaid)
  Acts of Service are activities that aid other individuals (particularly others wounded by addiction) or the community. They constitute one of the four core activities within the culture of recovery. Acts of service fulfill at least three functions: they constitute generic acts of restitution for the addiction-related harm to others, they promote self-healing, and, by piercing the narcissistic encapsulization of the recovery neophyte, they open up opportunities for authentic connection with others. Acts of service come in many forms: such acts are done for their intrinsic value and not for profit or hope of acknowledgment.  
Acultural Style (of recovery)
  Acultural Style is a style of recovery in which individuals initiate and sustain recovery from addiction without significant involvement with other people in recovery. The term acultural refers specifically to a lack of identification with a larger recovery community, e.g., involvement in a culture of recovery (White, 1996).

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Glossary List

  • Abstinence
      Abstinence, for addicts and alcoholics, is the nonuse of mood-altering drugs to include
  • Abstinence
    Abstinence is absence of alcohol and/or drugs as opposed to the term sober.  Abstinence does not im
  • Abstinence-Based Recovery
    Abstinence-based Recovery is the resolution of alcohol- and other drug-related problems through the
  • Abuse
      Abuse is a term to describe excessive drinking or using for relief from a problem in on
  • Acetaldehyde
      Acetaldehyde is the metabolite that occurs when alcohol dehydrogenase metabolizes alcoh